Our Expertise

Bacteriophage

Bacteriophage

There are countless kinds of bacteria in nature, and there are bacteriophages that kill bacteria. The number of bacteriophages is vast, and it is known that there are about 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (1031) bacteriophages.

Bacteria can proliferate indefinitely to increase their population.
Bacteriophages exist as a food chain in nature to suppress this infinite proliferation. For this reason, bacteriophages are also called ‘the natural enemy of bacteria’.

The term bacteriophage was derived from the Greek words ‘bacterio’ and ‘phage’, meaning ‘bacteria’ and ‘to devour’ respectively, so it literally interpreted as a ‘bacteria eater’.

Transmission electron micrograph of multiple bacteriophages attached to a bacterial cell wall. Dr. Graham Beards, CC BY-SA
Endolysin
A Game Changer in
Antibacterial Drugs

Endolysin is a ‘Bactericidal Enzyme’ and bacteria-killing which is derived from the life cycle of bacteriophages and its mode of action is to destroy the bacterial cell wall. Most conventional synthetic antibiotics work by inhibiting bacterial proliferation and are classified as bacteriostatic antibiotics. One of the most important limitation of conventional antibiotics are that they induce the development of resistance in bacteria due to its slow bacteria killing activity coming from their mode of action (MoA).

Endolysin has the ability to cleavage specific linkages in the bacterial peptidoglycan layer, and it works as the mode of action of endolysin to kill bacteria in a very potent and rapid manner. This characteristic offers endolysin the power to solve a fundamental problem of antibiotic resistance, and that is why endolysin is a perfectly novel type of antibiotic, functioning completely different from that of conventional antibiotics.

Although wild-type or natural endolysins have powerful bactericidal capabilities, iNtRON have applied various platform technologies including bioinformatics, protein chemistry, protein engineering, molecular modelling and bioengineering to the natural endolysins achieved from our long-term research to add additional functions or strengthen existing properties. We named this engineered endolysin ‘itLysin®’, and we are actively developing to secure a number of itLysin® pipelines.

A Game Changer in Antibacterial Drugs